i autistic » Dark Side

Having retired from autism work, Eric is now free to share what others find politically incorrect. The inconvenient truths impacting the lives of autistic adults are only meant for those psychologically ready to hear.

The human heart is like water, deep and unpredictable; handle with stillness.
Public sentiment is like smoke, chaotic and unreliable; we have to let it be.

How to identify and guard against Fake Autistics

The focus of this article is not to question autistic identity; it is on the threat posed by those who identify as autistic even though they have never, or no longer fulfill the official criteria for autism. Its intention is not to deny the autistic experience but to inform autistic people on how to identify...

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Hidden Agendas and Exploitation are Unavoidable

If you choose to identify as an autistic advocate, you choose to be exploited. There is no way to go around the hidden agendas of NeuroTypical people when we are working in NeuroTypical society. Are your efforts worthwhile after discounting for being taken advantage of, such as gaining access to disability support and facing more...

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Do not rely on disability awards

Many disability awards function more like subjective beauty pageants than meritocratic competitions based on objective criteria. However, as with most NeuroTypical activities, the organisers will only reveal a few of these criteria to the applicants. The award organisers have specific political aims and messages, which candidates must conform to. If the message is that autism...

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How to assess the quality of autism work

Confronting our inconvenient truths is necessary for the growth of each person. Due to political incorrectness and to avoid unnecessary drama, people will not provide feedback on the quality of our autism work even when actively solicited. We need to be able to perform quality control by ourselves to ensure that we contribute effectively to...

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When we decide to leave autism/disability behind

While I cannot speak for the experiences of NeuroTypical people who preach the value of community and teamwork, I learned that people are often unreliable and disloyal when I need them the most. I am the only person I can unconditionally rely on and trust. Too many autistic people are convinced that their disability entitles...

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