Asperger's Syndrome Test

More Tests | DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder | Autistic Disorder | Asperger's | Rett's | CDD | Ideal Environment

Disclaimer: The information provided here is for educational purposes only. Consult a qualified medical professional for advice and clarification.


People with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) tend to have normal to above-normal intelligence (as measured by IQ tests). They tend to exhibit what some call the "Walking Dictionary Syndrome" - a non-stop flood of words about their obsessions or knowledge.

The table below provides a simplified version of the DSM-IV definition, used by professionals to diagnose disorders.

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To make a rough assessment of whether a person has Asperger's Syndrome or not, tick the box under "ANS" if your client matches the description.

Note: If you are diagnosing an adult client, it is best to use his behavior as a young child for this test. He may learnt to cope through experience and may not fulfill the diagnostic criteria any more.

Criteria ANS
I. The client has obvious and consistent problems with social interactions, as described by at least 2 of the following:

A

Does not use body language when interacting (e.g. no eye contact, no change of facial expression, maintains a rigid body posture)

B

Does not develop relationships like others of his same age-group (e.g. a student makes friends with his teachers but not his classmates)

C

Lack of spontaneous emotional expression and sharing with others (e.g. does not point at objects; does not play with, touch, and chit-chat with others by his own initiative)

D Lack of social or emotional playing (e.g. preferring to be alone, not participating in social games, or reluctantly involving others only as tools or "mechanical" aids)

II. The client keeps repeating certain limited activities or pursuing certain specialized interests, described by at least one of the following:

A

Constant and persistent behavior that cannot be explained (e.g. keeps counting coins, watching bottle cap move, or watching the same video clip again and again)

B

Insistence on following specific, useless routines and rituals (e.g. must eat the same food prepared the same way in the same way; must always go to school on the same time along the same route doing the same things)

C

Keeps making the same useless movement without reason (e.g. hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)

D Obsession with certain parts of objects (e.g. keeps playing with wheels of a truck or fan propeller)

(III) The client finds that he has serious social problems with both his personal and professional life

(IV) The client learns to speak at about the same time as most children (e.g. single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years)
(V) Other than difficulties with social interaction, the client has no other problems developing his other mental abilities (e.g. being curious about the environment)
(VI) The client does not suffer from another specific Pervasive Developmental Disorder or Schizophrenia
probably NOT autistic

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DSM-IV definition for Asperger's Syndrome (299.80)

(I) Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:

  • (A) marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, & gestures to regulate social interaction
  • (B) failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
  • (C) a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interest or achievements with other people, (e.g. by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people)
  • (D) lack of social or emotional reciprocity


(II) Restricted repetitive & stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, & activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:

  • (A) encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped & restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
  • (B) apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
  • (C) stereotyped & repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g. hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
  • (D) persistent preoccupation with parts of objects


(III) The disturbance causes clinically significant impairments in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

(IV) There is no clinically significant general delay in language (e.g. single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years)

(V) There is no clinically significant delay in cognitive development or in the development of age-appropriate self help skills, adaptive behavior (other than in social interaction) & curiosity about the environment in childhood.

(VI) Criteria are not met for another specific Pervasive Developmental Disorder or Schizophrenia.

More Tests | DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder | Autistic Disorder | Asperger's | Rett's | CDD | Ideal Environment

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